KENGO SAN

Kengo Oshima’s first musical influence was in the 90s. He had heard a track “You Can Call Me Al” by Paul Simon in the album Graceland firstly from his friend’s father. “The bass riff was most memorable, then the poetry really grew on me,” as he recalls the trigger to his musical sensibility.

The Cuban Brothers are a musical group who pride themselves on giving a full on performance of music, comedy, and a whole lot of dancing. They make sure they challenge themselves and have fun while they do it and this translates very much to Kengo’s outlook in life by wholeheartedly taking on the role of a DJ, dancer, and choreographer.

Although looking very much fluid on the dance floor, Kengo shares his suave for dancing to happen by accident. He explored break dancing when he was 18 before eventually making dancing a lifestyle,”I really got into it straight away because I enjoyed the physical aspect of it, the fusion of body and music and the challenge of training and improvement — trying to do something you can’t do.” He personifies a level of enjoyment which equals the dedication and training in constantly improving his craft.

The key to being as productive as Kengo is to be hungry. His sense of inquisitiveness arrived to him from indulging and sharing his music collection since high school, he would make eclectic mix tapes of anything from Bulgarian choir to Motown to punk to classical which then continued to his current profession as a DJ. “The technical aspect of mixing which you can learn in a short amount of time, taste takes much longer to develop – that comes from keeping an open mind to music, listening to whole albums rather than just the singles and generally being hungry for music you haven’t heard before.”

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